Witchcraft, Alewives, and Economics

I was finishing up a two week holiday in Bergen, Norway, when I decided to spend my last day checking out some of the historical sites in the city. The first on my list was Rosenkrantz tower, an imposing, largely Early Modern, but originally medieval, structure and one of a series of buildings on Bergenhus Fortress premises. The tours themselves were self-guided and this made me slightly nervous as I know that these older structures can be very confusing and its easy to get turned around. Especially with my exceedingly impressive penchant for getting lost in the simplest of locations. I had managed, just a week or so previous, to completely lose myself in the London Tube (Bank Station is now my sworn enemy).

Read More…

#31BeerHerstories Mega List

Behold! The Mega List ™ of all the #31beerherstories all in one place for your reading pleasure. I hope it is somewhat useful to have them all in one place. I will also be posting some final thoughts on the themes I have seen throughout this project later on. I have essentially copied and pasted […]

Read More…

Hen Droppings and Rosary Beads: The Tunning of Elynour Rummyng

She breweth nappy ale, And maketh thereof pot-sale To travellers, to tinkers, To sweaters, to swinkers, And all good ale-drinkers, Sometime around 1517 John Skelton sat down and wrote one of the most well-known poems of the Early Modern era. A poet and priest, Skelton was accustomed to running in elite circles, from the royal […]

Read More…

Ale and The Apocalypse

This is the first in a series of posts detailing the ways in which female brewers came to be pushed out of brewing and how contemporary attitudes of women in this industry shaped and aided this process. This post is to form an introduction and overview which the following series of posts will investigate in further depth. The next instalment is entitled ‘Bagpipes’ and details the depictions of alewives in art.

Read More…